Linda McQuaig

Best Selling Author and Journalist

Linda McQuaig

Journalist and best-selling author Linda McQuaig has developed a reputation for challenging the establishment.

As a reporter for The Globe and Mail, she won a National Newspaper Award in 1989 for writing a series of articles which sparked a public inquiry into the activities of Ontario political lobbyist Patti Starr, and eventually led to Starr's imprisonment. And as a Senior Writer for Maclean's magazine, McQuaig (and Ian Austen) wrote two cover stories probing the questionable business dealings of Conrad Black in connection with a US takeover bid in the early 1980s. An irate Black suggested on CBC radio that McQuaig should be horsewhipped.

In 1991, she was awarded an Atkinson Fellowship for Journalism in Public Policy to study the social welfare systems in Europe and North America. From 2002 to 2013, McQuaig wrote an op-ed column for the Toronto Star. Since April 2014, she has been writing a weekly column for

She was the NDP candidate in the federal by-election in Toronto Centre in November 2013.

She is author of nine books on politics and economics – including six national bestsellers – such asShooting the Hippo (short-listed for the Governor General's Award for Non-Fiction), The Cult of Impotence, All You Can Eat, and It's the Crude, Dude: War, Big Oil and the Fight for the Planet.

Her most recent book, co-authored with Neil Brooks, is The Trouble with Billionaires: How the Super-Rich Hijacked the World (and How We Can Take It Back).

  1. The Trouble With Billionaires

    The glittering lives of billionaires may seem like a harmless source of entertainment. But such concentrated economic power reverberates throughout society, threatening the quality of life and the very functioning of democracy. It's no accident that the United States claims the most billionaires – but suffers among the highest rates of infant mortality and crime, the shortest life expectancy, as well as the lowest rates of social mobility and electoral political participation in the developed world.

    Our society tends to regard large fortunes as evidence of great talent or accomplishment. Yet the vast new wealth isn't due to an increase in talent or effort at the top, but rather to changing social attitudes legitimizing greed and government policy changes that favour the new elite. Authoritative and eye-opening, The Trouble With Billionaires will spark debate about the kind of society we want.

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